Breaking News
Download http://bigtheme.net/joomla Free Templates Joomla! 3
Home / News / Report highlights high cost of violence against children

Report highlights high cost of violence against children

The economic impact of the violence against children in Nigeria is estimated to be about USD$6.1 billion, which is equivalent to about 1.07 percent of the country’s GDP. 

The high economic cost of violence against children in Nigeria was revealed in an unprecedented report, launched jointly by UNICEF and the Federal Government, under the leadership of the Ministry of Budget and National Planning and the Federal Ministry of Women Affairs and Social Development.

Speaking at the launching of the report, Mrs Ifeoma Anagbogu, the Permanent  Secretary  of the Federal Ministry of Women Affairs and Social Development disclosed that the cost of inaction is high when it comes to violence against children.

“Violence affects children’s health, education, and productivity. It is clear that we need to eliminate any form of violence against children, both from a moral perspective and an economic perspective.”

UNICEF Country Representative in Nigeria, Mohammed Fall spoke on the need to increase investment in child protection services in the country.

“This year marks the 30th anniversary of the Convention of the Rights of the Child, giving us an opportunity to join our collective efforts to protecting children from violence, abuse and neglect. This includes a re-commitment to increase investment in child protection services”.

 The report revealed that about half of the Nigerian children surveyed experienced physical violence by parents, adult relatives, direct or indirect caregivers or community members, before they reached 18.

The financial loss is from the cumulative loss of earnings due to loss of productivity, stemming from suffering associated with different degrees of violence, over time.

 The Permanent Secretary of the Ministry of Budget and National Planning, Mr Olajide Odewale emphasized that the findings of the study point to the strong need for increased funding of interventions by government to reduce violence against children in Nigeria.

It was noted that the study may actually underestimate the economic burden of violence against children, as several serious consequences of such violence were not included, due to a current lack of data.

“The evidence presented in the report indicates an urgent need to provide child protection services in Nigeria and prioritize the elimination of violence against children.

It will  ensure the country’s human capital has the mental, physical, and emotional stability needed to boost its social and economic development.”

Check Also

The Minister of Transportation, Mr Rotimi Amaechi on Wednesday jokingly thanked President Muhammadu Buhari for not converting him to Islam, saying he was misunderstood and criticised for associating with the president. He spoke when members of the Federal Executive Council (FEC) on Wednesday expressed appreciation to the President for the opportunity he gave them to serve in his cabinet. At the valedictory session of the council, ministers in the cabinet took turns to narrate the lessons they learnt from the president as members of his cabinet. Amaechi narrated how he was almost chased out of Christ the King Catholic Church in 2014 for supporting the president, whom they alleged was trying to Islamise the country. “Mr President, let me thank you for not converting me to Islam. I say that specifically because in 2014 when I walked into Christ the King Catholic Church, I was literally chased out of the church as a governor because I was accused of supporting a man whose agenda was to Islamise Nigeria. “And in Rivers state they began to call me `Alhaji Rotimi Chibuike Amaechi’. I thank you because they have dropped the `Alhaji’ and back to Mr Chibuike Amaechi,’’ he said. Amaechi said some persons initially thought that the president would be an autocratic leader only for him to turn out to be an “extreme democrat’’. “I was told in the course of the campaign that you were autocratic and therefore you would not be democratic. “Most of us are not happy that you have moved from your autocratic nature to an extreme democrat that everything puts to test of the people, to the extent that the people now feel that the only way things can go on in this country is by the rule of law. “We all know that the rule of law is the beginning and the end of this government. Talking about the financial impunity that we saw before, people were making money without having any productive capacity for that,’’ he said.

Share this on WhatsApp The Minister of Transportation, Mr Rotimi Amaechi on Wednesday jokingly thanked …

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *